How Donald Trump is dominating in Ireland

Donald Trump’s rally in Dublin was the biggest crowd to see a US presidential candidate since 2008, with thousands turning out to see him as he took to the stage.

It was the largest rally to be held in the city since the election of Barack Obama.

The billionaire businessman’s campaign has been a huge success in the country, with tens of thousands turning up to his rallies.

“It was huge,” said Anthony D’Agostino, who turned up to the event at the city’s Grandstand.

The rally, which was the first in Dublin since the US election, saw thousands of people crowd into the streets for a “March to Donald Trump”.

“He’s coming to the capital,” Mr D’AGOSTINO said, gesturing towards a crowd of supporters at the entrance to the city centre.

“I think it’s huge.

I think it will go to 10,000 people.”

The march began at 6pm local time (13:00 GMT), and the Trump rally went on for an hour and a half.

The rally was one of the biggest in the US since 2008.

Mr Trump’s speech was filled with economic populism and promises of massive tax cuts for the wealthy, as well as his controversial decision to ban Muslims from entering the country.

Trump had been invited to Dublin to speak to the Irish people, but cancelled the event, citing security concerns.

His appearance at the rally was a first for the billionaire.

“It was a little bit strange, I mean, I haven’t seen a lot of politicians that were in Dublin in the past,” he said.

Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in the heart of Dublin on January 6, 2020.

After his speech, Mr Trump said: “I am honored to be here tonight and to welcome the people of Ireland to our beautiful capital.”

Dublin Mayor Leo Varadkar said he hoped Mr Trump’s visit would boost the city as a whole.

Dubliners were already in the mood for a change, with crowds of hundreds lining up to buy a Trump T-shirt, the largest selling item on the internet at the time.

“There’s not been anything like it in Dublin before.

It’s going to be really positive,” said Michael, a Dublin resident who had bought a shirt for his son.

He was pleased to see Mr Trump at the event.

However, it was the arrival of Donald Trump in Dublin that was most talked about in the Irish media.

There were a number of tweets on Twitter on Monday morning, where people were discussing the Trump phenomenon.

@bryanbarnes @realDonaldTrump Dublin is a city that I love and I love to live in.

It is the greatest city in the world.

pic.twitter.com/6v6gqYb7mq — Joe C (@joecjoe) January 7, 2020″Dublin is a great place to live, but the Trump crowd in Dublin is what is killing me,” one tweeted.

Another commented: “Dublin has been in a Trump slump.

They’re doing it with their crowds.”

In an interview with The Irish Times, Mr Varadker said: ‘The Trump factor is very much the reason for this rally.

It seems to be an opportunity to have a political rally.’

Mr Varadkary said he had not yet received any complaints from Irish people about Mr Trump.

‘Trump has been here for a long time'”There’s a certain number of people who want to be at his rallies and that’s fine,” he added.

“But I’m very happy to see that the people are coming out. “

They’ve been there for a while and we love them, and they want their voice heard. “

But I’m very happy to see that the people are coming out.

“As long as it’s peaceful, I think that’s the important thing.” “

As Trump arrives in Dublin, he will face off against another US president, Democrat Joe Biden, who is seeking re-election in November.”

As long as it’s peaceful, I think that’s the important thing.”

As Trump arrives in Dublin, he will face off against another US president, Democrat Joe Biden, who is seeking re-election in November.